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Easter: Symbols and Traditions

Tagged: Easter, family, holidays, spirituality,

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With Easter weekend just around the corner, we take a deeper look at some of the common symbols and traditions which have come to make Easter what it is today! History of Easter Easter is a Christian holiday that is celebrated around the world, with Easter Sunday being the most attended service throughout the year for Christian churches. This year, Easter Sunday falls on March 27th and is a time where families come together to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ after he is thought to have died on the cross on Good Friday. Many people understand the relevance and belief associated with Easter, but very few know why and how traditions and symbols came about, and their relevance to Easter. Read on to fuel your knowledge and share these interesting facts with your friends and family! Easter Bunny The much loved Easter bunny became a part of the Easter tradition in the 1700’s. It is thought that when German Immigrants became settled in Pennsylvania, their children would use their hats, grass or straw to create a nest due to their German traditions. If they were well behaved, the Easter bunny would reward them with coloured eggs. This tradition spread throughout the United States and many other countries around the world along with this catchy fictional story. Easter eggs The Easter egg symbolises new life, which represents Jesus’ resurrection from the tomb. Throughout history, many people carried the tradition of hoping to resurrect the dead, which is why Ostrich eggs were painted gold and silver and placed in graves, hoping to bring back Sumerians and Egyptians to life. Throughout the years, painting eggs and filling them with chocolates and sweets has become a more common tradition. Here in the UK, children associate the holiday with chocolate eggs, delivered to them on Easter morning by the Easter bunny! Similar to the myth of receiving coal instead of presents from Father Christmas, the same rule often applies to Easter. Children will not receive any chocolate Easter eggs from the Easter bunny if they have been naughty! Celebrations and parades In large cities around the world, roads are shut down and parades take place as a way for people to come together and celebrate Jesus’ resurrection. While parades take place in many small communities around the world, larger parades such as the ones in London and New York are some of the most popular and are televised each year. Easter food The most popular Easter meals are lamb and ham, which have remained a tradition in Christian households throughout the decades. This could be because of the symbolism associated with God sacrificing a lamb for his followers, so they were able to continue living. If you are in need of guidance over the Easter weekend, do not hesitate to call Psychic Light. Don’t forget that our talented team of psychics are available 24/7, 365 days a year so simply pick up the phone whenever you are in need of advice.  

Posted: 16/03/2016

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